Monroeville Water Authority Building


divider

 

water quality report

2012 Water Quality Report

The Monroeville Municipal Authority is Committed to Providing a High Quality Drinking Water that Meets and/or Exceeds All Established Government Standards

The Monroeville Municipal Authority (MMA) is proud to present its 2012 Water Quality Report. This report provides our customers with a summary of where their drinking water comes from, how it is treated, and the results of water quality monitoring performed on a daily basis. To meet the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ruling requiring all U.S. water utilities to provide customers with this information, we will be mailing our 2012 water quality report to all MMA customers by July 1, 2013.

The MMA has consistently met and exceeded drinking water standards established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) and the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD). How do we do this? All of the employees at the MMA share the same goal– to provide our customers with safe and reliable drinking water at the lowest rate possible.

 

WHERE DOES MY DRINKING WATER COME FROM?

The MMA’s primary surface water supply is the Allegheny River. The Allegheny River begins as a spring in a farmer’s field in the upper Appalachian Mountains of northern Pennsylvania. It then collects in the Allegheny Reservoir (Kinzua Dam) and flows to the confluence with the Monongahela River. The Allegheny River Watershed encompasses 11,770 square miles and includes most of Western Pennsylvania and parts of South West New York. The MMA water is drawn from the Allegheny River near Oakmont, Pennsylvania. The quality of the water from the Allegheny River can be affected by mine acid drainage, sewage treatment plant discharge, agriculture and livestock runoff, leaking underground and under river pipelines, leaking chemical storage tanks, river barges and railroad cars transporting chemicals.

Allegheny River Water Shed


 
HOW DO DRINKING WATER SOURCES BECOME POLLUTED?

As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:

Monroeville Water Authority
Microbiological contaminants (bacteria, viruses, protozoan, etc.) can come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural live stock operations, and wildlife.
Monroeville Water Authority
Inorganic chemical contaminants, such as salts and metals, which can be naturally occurring or result from urban stormwater run off, industrial and/or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
Monroeville Water Authority
Pesticides and herbicides which may occur from a variety of sources such as agriculture, urban stormwater runoff, and residential uses.
Monroeville Water Authority
Organic chemical contaminants, including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum production, and can also come from gasoline stations, urban stormwater runoff, and septic systems.
Monroeville Water Authority
Radioactive contaminants, which can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production, or mining activities.

Este informe contiene informacion muy importante sobre su agua de beber. Traduzcalo o hable con alguien que lo entienda bien. (This report contains very important information about your drinking water. Translate it or speak to someone who understands it.)

DEFINITIONS OF TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS USED:

Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) - The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCL's are set as close to the MCLG's as feasible using the best available treatment technology.

Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) - The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLG's allow for a margin of safety.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL) - The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.

Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) - The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contamination.

NTU - A measure of water clarity. Measurements are given in “Nephelometric Turbity Units.”

Picocuries Per Liter (pCi/L) - A measure of radioactivity.

Parts Per Billion (ppb) - One part per billion, or micrograms per liter. (Equivalent to one penny in 10 million dollars.)

Parts Per Million (ppm) - One part per million, or milligrams per liter. (Equivalent to one penny in 10 thousand dollars.)

Haloacetic Acids (HAAs) - A group of chemicals called “disinfection by-products”, which form during chlorination.

Total Trihalomethanes (TTHMs) - A group of chemicals called "disinfection by-products" that form during chlorination. TTHMs form when natural organic matter in the river, (e.g.), leaves and algae decompose and combine chemically with the chlorine added for disinfection.

Total Organic Carbon (TOC) - The measure of the carbon content of organic matter.The measure provides an indicator of how much organic material is in the water and could potentially react with chlorine to form HAAs and THMs.

Treatment Technique (TT) - A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.

Millirems Per Year (Mrem/year) - A measure of radiation absorbed by the body.

Lead - Infants and young children are typically more vulnerable to lead in drinking water than the general population. It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than at other homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home’s plumbing. If you are concerned about elevated lead levels in your home’s water, you may wish to have your water tested and flush your tap for 1 to 2 minutes before using tap water to cook with or drink.

Additional information is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline @ http://www.epa.gov/safewater or 1-800-426-4791

WORKING HARD FOR YOU

Under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), EPA is responsible for setting national limits for hundreds of substances in drinking water and also specifies various treatments that water systems must use to remove these substances. We continually monitor for these substances and report directly to the EPA if they were detected in the drinking water. EPA uses this data to ensure that consumers are receiving clean water and verify that states are enforcing the laws that regulate drinking water. During 2007 MMA received a certificate of recognition from PADEP for meeting all MCL, monitoring, reporting, and treatment technique performance requirements under the Safe Drinking Water Program. The MMA also received a certificate of achievement from the ACHD for operating its drinking water system in compliance with all water quality, treatment, and monitoring requirements. The Monroeville Municipal Authority is committed to providing you with this information about your water supply, because customers who are well informed are our best allies in supporting improvements necessary to maintain the highest drinking water standards.

REQUIRED CCR STATEMENT ADDRESSING LEAD IN DRINKING WATER

If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. Monroeville Municipal Authority is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline or at: http://www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

HOW IS MY DRINKING WATER TREATED AND PURIFIED?

The MMA receives its primary supply of finished water for resale from the Wilkinsburg – Penn Joint Water Authority (WPJWA) system. Like the majority of water utilities in the U.S., the WPJWA uses a multi-step treatment process at their water treatment plant. River water is pumped from the Allegheny River to the treatment plant and chlorinated. The water is then coagulated (which means the smaller particles in the river water join together by adding chemicals, which encourage this attraction). The water is mixed to ensure that the added chemicals are well blended and reacting with all of the smaller particles. The water is allowed to settle so that the newly joined particles sink by gravity to the bottom of the sedimentation tanks. The sediment is then removed and sent to the Allegheny County Sanitation Authority (ALCOSAN) for treatment. The settled water is then filtered to remove any remaining particles. Chlorine is then again added to prevent the growth of bacteria during transport and storage.

The finished water enters the MMA system through two separate metered connections. By agreement with WPJWA, the  MMA is permitted to withdraw 6.0 million gallons per day (mgd) of monthly average flow and 7.5 mgd of peak daily flow from the above connections. In addition to the primary source of supply, the MMA maintains two emergency interconnections with the Municipal Authority of Westmoreland County (MAWC) system. The MMA maintains four storage tanks to serve as a reserve for fire protection and to maintain adequate water pressure. These tanks have a combined capacity of 13.5 million gallons. The water is then delivered to your home or business through a network of over 165 miles of waterlines varying in size from 4 to 24 inches in diameter. If you desire more information about the quality of the water provided by the MMA, please call the MMA Manager, John A. Capor at (412) 372-2677 or log on to our web site at http:// www.monroevillewater.org. The MMA Board of Directors meets at 7:00 p.m. on the fourth Monday of the month at 219 Speelman Ln., Monroeville, PA 15146, and these meetings are open to the public. The MMA water system identification number is 5020027.

WHY IS CHLORINE USED TO DISINFECT MY DRINKING WATER?

State and federal regulations require the disinfection of all public water supplies. The EPA and other health agencies recognize that using chlorine is one of the most effective ways to protect public health from disease causing organisms that can be found in surface waters. Because chlorine used alone can react with natural materials in the river water to chemically form disinfection by-products such as Total Trihalomethanes (TTHMs), the Authority has been evaluating chlorination procedures to reduce the formation of TTHMs. However, we will continue to ensure that the water distributed to your home has a sufficient "chlorine residual" to prohibit the growth of bacteria and other organisms, to not increase TTHMs, and to not have an offensive chlorine smell and/or taste.

WHAT’S IN MY WATER?

In order to ensure that the water coming from your tap is suitable to drink, the EPA and the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) have established regulations that limit the amount of certain chemicals in water provided for public water systems. Refer to the attached charts detailing our water quality test results for a complete listing of detected contaminants.

Drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. The presence of these contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk. To obtain more information about chemicals and potential health effects, call the EPA's Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or visit their web site: http://www.epa.gov/safewater
 

NOTICE: IMPORTANT INFORMATION

Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population. Immuno-compromised persons, such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV/AIDS, or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants, can be particularly at risk from infections. These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. EPA/Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and other microbial contaminants are available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791).

PUBLIC NOTIFICATION NEWS

As part of the requirements of the Public Notification Rule promulgated in 2009, Monroeville Municipal Authority has
entered into an agreement with Swift Reach to manage our public notification situations. This will enable MMA to get in
contact with our customers in case the need presents itself (i.e. Tier 1 violation, health warning, areas of flushing, water
conservation orders, etc.) in the most quick and efficient way. If you have any questions please call us at 412-372-2677.

 

PWS ID# 5020056

CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT 2012 (WPJWA 2012 DATA)

LISTED - Chemicals that were detected in WPJWA drinking water during 2012.  Even though detected, all are below the allowable levels.
NOT LISTED - More than fifty other chemicals which were tested for and not found to exceed federal or state laws. These analyses were performed to ensure the quality of the water produced.

 

 

Contaminant (Units) Violation MCL MCLG LEVEL DETECTED IN WPJWA WATER RANGE OF DETECTIONS
MAJOR SOURCES OF CONTAMINANTS
Turbidity (NTU) No TT = 95% of samples <0.3 NTU 0 0.06(a)
100%
0.02 - 0.06 (a)
Soil Runoff
Floride (ppm) No 2 2 0.93 0.34 - 1.06
Erosions of natural deposits; discharge from fertilizer & aluminum factories; Water additive for strong teeth.
Nitrate (ppm) No 10 10 0.71 0.27 - 0.71
Fertilizer runoff; sewage and septic tank leakage; erosion of natural deposits.
Beta/Photon emitters (pCi/L) No 50 0 1.7 (b) (d) 0 - 1.7 (b) (d)
Decay of natural & manmade deposits.
Barium (ppm) No 2 2 0.04 0.04
Discharge of drilling wastes and metal refineries; Erosion of natural deposits
Uranium (ug/L) No 30 0 0.62 (b) (d) 0.07 - 0.62 (b) (d)
Erosions of natural deposits
Corrosivity

No

TT N/A N/A N/A
Tendency of water
to dissolve or deposit minerals and metals

PWS ID# 5020027

CONSUMER CONFIDENCE REPORT 2012 (MMA 2012 DATA)

Contaminant (Units) Violation MCL MRDL/MCLG AVERAGE LEVEL DETECTED HIGHEST & LOWEST LEVEL DETECTED
MAJOR SOURCES OF CONTAMINANTS
Total Coliform Bacteria No 5% of monthly samples are positive 0 0.34% 0 - 4.05%
Naturally present in the environment.
Chlorine (ppm) No 4 4 .29 0.12 - 0.41
Water additive used to control microbes
Haloacetic Acids (ppb) No 60 (g) 0 4.5 0-11.1
By-product of drinking water clorination
Total Trihalomethanes (ppb) No 80 (g) 0 54.6 12.5-109
By-product of drinking water clorination
Corrowsivity (water samples from individual consumer taps)   EPA'S ACTION LEVEL EPA'S (MCLG) IDEAL GOAL 90TH PERCENTILE RESULT OF SAMPLE SITE # OF SITES ABOVE ACTION LEVEL
MAJOR SOURCES OF CONTAMINANT
Lead (ppb) No 15 0 2 (c) 1 out of 30
Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits.
Copper (ppm)

No

1.3 1.3 0.093(c) 0 out of 30
Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits.

(a) 100% of Turbidity samples met the Turbidity limits specified in the PA Safe Drinking Water Act.
(b) Testing required every nine (9) years.
(c) 2010 data 
(d) 2011 Data - Compliance with the MCL may be assumed without further analysis if the average concentration of Gross Beta Particle Activity is less than 50 pCi/l.

All contaminants listed were detected in Monroeville Municipal Authority drinking water during 2012, and, unless otherwise stated, are below allowable levels.
More than 50 other contaminants were tested for and not detected in Monroeville Municipal Authority drinking water.
DEFINITIONS OF TERMS USED:
Action Level ( AL ) The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements which a water system must follow.
Maximum Contamination Level (MCL) The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the MCLG's as feasible using the best available treatment technology.
Maximum Contamination Level Goal (MCLG) The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLG's allow for a margin of safety.
Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL) The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) The level of a drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contamination.
NTU A measure of water clarity. Measurements are given in "Nephelometric Turbity Units.
Picocuries Per Liter (pCi/L) A measure of radioactivity.
Parts Per Billion (ppb) One part per billion, or microgrms per liter. (Equivalent to one penny in 10 million dollars).
Parts Per Million (ppm) One part per million, or milligrams per liter. (Equivalent to one penny in 10 thousand dollars).
Haloacetic Acids (HAAs) A group of chemicals called "disinfection by-products", which form during chlorination.
Total Trihalomethanes (THMs) A group of chemicals called " disinfection by-products" that form during chlorination. THMs form when natural organic matter in the river ( e.g., leaves and algae ) decompose and combine chemically with the chlorine added for disinfection.
Total Organic Carbon (TOC) The measure of the carbon content of organic matter. The measure provides an indicator of how much organic material is in the water and could potentially react with chlorine to form HAAs and THMs.
Treatment Technique (TT) A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.
Millirems Per Year (Mrem/year) A measure of radiation absorbed by the body.
Lead Infants and young children are typically more vulnerable to lead in drinking water than the general population. It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than at other homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home's plumbing. If you are concerned about elevated lead levels in your home's water, you may wish to have your water tested and flush your tap for 1 to 2 minutes before using tap water to cook with or drink. Additional information is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline @ http://www.epa.gov/safewater or 1-800-426-4791

Download 2012 Water Quality Report

Get Adobe Reader Free!

Viewing file requires Adobe Acrobat Reader
(Click for free download)

divider

Home
Board Members
Water Quality
Rates & Fees
Facts & Figures
Rules & Regulations
Conservation
Frequently Asked Questions
News
History
Cross Connection
Dye Testing
Auto Pay
Links
Contact MMA
Current Notifications
Pay by Credit Card
Act 44 Disclosure
 

divider

Monroeville Municipal Authority
219 Speelman Lane
Monroeville, PA  15146
Directions
Phone - 412-372-2677
(24 hours/day and emergencies)

Fax - 412-372-2523
General Manager - John A. Capor 

Hours: Monday: 8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.  •  Tuesday - Friday: 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Copyright © 2012 Monroeville Municipal Authority,  All Rights Reserved

Website designed and maintained by Evan Karelitz